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The Best Hammock Camping Grounds Across Canada

August 16, 2018

A Canadian maple leaf, orange in autumn weather, held in a man's hand.

A Guide to the Best Camping Spots Across Our Gorgeous Nation

Canada is home to many beautiful national and provincial park. Coast to coast, there are stunning spots that are yours to discover right in your own backyard. The best part? These parks have plenty of excellent hammock camping sites to enjoy, by the water and under the stars.

As discussed in our previous articles, hammock camping is incredibly convenient and comfortable, especially when you have the right hammock camping gear.

Camping hammocks in Canada are durable, lightweight, and fast drying so you can easily pack up and carry your hammock wherever your adventure takes you.

Camping hammocks can also come with a built-in mosquito net for ease-of-use and comfort. Mosquito nets are a must-have to keep you protected from bites while you sleep.

For couples and anyone who wants to snuggle while camping, there are also double, or two-person camping hammocks available.

Also, choose ridgeline cord and tree-hugger straps to hang your hammock between two sturdy trees. These tree straps won’t hurt the trees you’re hanging from.

Aside from hanging a hammock between two trees, there are many other ways you can enjoy your hammock while camping. Hammock camping allows you to get creative and live off the beaten path for as long as you have fuel in your pack and water in your jug. If you’re wondering how to hang a hammock at the beach or if you can enjoy hammock camping without trees, look for a portable hammock stand to take with you on your adventure.

Whether you’re looking for your next big adventure, or to simply unplug and recharge by spending time in the great outdoors, we’ve compiled a list of the best places to hammock camp in Canada from coast to coast. Let’s start at the Pacific Ocean!

A yellow canoe paddles across a beautiful clear lake sitting at the foot of British Columbian mountains.

British Columbia

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

Considered some of the best camping in BC, this park is home to the 75-km West Coast Trail. This ocean-side park is also rich in natural history and Nuu-chah-nulth culture.

What to do: Take a stroll on the gorgeous beach or the West Coast Trail, and don’t forget to go surfing or kayaking!

Fees: Starting from $24 per night

Campsite availability: March to October

Website: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim

Location: This park reserve is about a half-hour drive west from Victoria.

Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park

This park is home to the 3,618-metre high Assiniboine Mountain, part of the Canadian Rockies. It also has spectacular views of lakes, glaciers, and alpine meadows.

What to do: Hike the Assiniboine Mountain and take in the stunning scenery.

Fees: Starting from $10 per person per night

Campsite availability: June to September

Website: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/mt_assiniboine/

Location: Accessible only by walking trails, this park is about a half-hour hike from Radium Hot Springs.

The Rocky Mountains stand above a beautiful view of Moraine Lake in Banff National Park, Alberta.

Alberta

Jasper National Park

Jasper National Park is more than 11,000 square kilometres in the Canadian Rockies, with scenic views of lakes, mountains, and wildlife.

What to do: Hike the Rockies, visit the fractured tongue of the Athabasca Glacier at the Columbia Icefield, and go on guided glacier walks.

Fees: Starting from $15.70

Campsite availability: Year-round

Website: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/jasper

Location: Jasper National Park is about a three-hour drive west from Edmonton.

Banff National Park

With awe-inspiring views of the Rocky Mountains, glacial lakes, and forest, Banff is a must-visit park for camping in Alberta.

What to do: Explore the national historic sites, such as the Cave and Basin, and relax in the natural hot springs.

Fees: Starting at $11 per night per person

Campsite availability: Year-round

Website: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/banff

Location: Banff National Park is a one-and-a-half-hour drive west from Calgary.

Saskatchewan's prairies stretch out on either side of a gravel road beneath a blue sky filled with beautiful clouds.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park

This provincial park along the South Saskatchewan River has many historical sites and interpretative trails to discover. Visitors to the park also enjoy fishing, swimming, and sunbathing.

What to do: Go for a swim at the beach, or visit the historic sites, such as the Goodwin House.

Fees: Starting from $18 per person per night

Campsite availability: May long weekend to Labour Day

Website: http://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/provincialpark/312/saskatchewan-landing-provincial-park#sort=relevancy

Location: Saskatchewan Landing is about a half-hour drive north from Swift Current.

Meadow Lake Provincial Park

This 1,600-kilometre park has more than 20 rivers, lakes, and streams. Its Boreal Trail is one of the top hiking destinations in Canada, and its beaches are some of the best in the province.

What to do: Go for a hike along the Boreal Trail or relax at the beach.

Fees: Starting from $18 per person per night

Campsite availability: May long weekend to Labour Day

Website: http://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/provincialpark/2965/meadow-lake-provincial-park#sort=relevancy

Location: Meadow Lake Provincial Park is about a two-hour drive north from Lloydminster, Alberta.

Stars swirl in a stylized Manitoba sky at night.

Manitoba

Vermillion Park Campground

Vermillion Park has plenty of comforts for campers, such as fire pits, picnic areas, water, and washrooms. There is also a 2-km walking trail and the Dead River, which is home to local wildlife.

What to do: Take a walk along the walking trail and enjoy a picnic in the covered picnic area if it starts to rain.

Fees: Starting from $15 per campsite per night

Campsite availability: Until mid-October

Website: https://dauphinrec.com/index.php/facilities/vermillion-park-campground

Location: The Vermillion Park Campground is located in Dauphin. 

Steep Rock Beach Park

Located along the shores of Lake Manitoba, campers can take in the beautiful views of the lake, sunsets, and rock and cliff formations.

What to do: Explore the private coves, beaches, and trails.

Fees: Starting at $26.80 per night per campsite

Campsite availability: May to October

Website: www.steeprockbeach.ca

Location: Steep Rock Beach Park is about a two-and-a-half-hour drive north from Winnipeg.

A sunset view of the Georgian Bay and Lake Huron, looking off Dyer's Bay on the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario.

Ontario

Algonquin Provincial Park

This 7,600-square kilometre park is one of Canada’s largest and is filled with beautiful lakes, portage trails, and wildlife. Algonquin Park has both backcountry campsites you can reach by hiking or canoeing, and campsites accessible by car.

What to do: Wildlife watching and the weekly wolf howl.

Fees: $12.43 per person per night for backcountry campsites. And about $44 per night for six people and one vehicle for developed campsites.

Availability: April to October

Website: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Location: Algonquin Park is situated between the Ottawa River and Georgian Bay and is about a three-hour drive from both Ottawa and Toronto.

Bruce Peninsula National Park

This 154-square kilometre park is part of the Niagara Escarpment and has a rocky landscape. Here, you can swim in clear, turquoise blue waters and take in views of the sunset over the peninsula cliffs.

What to do: Hike or swim to the Grotto cave, and visit the rocky Indian Head Cove beach.

Fees: Starting at $4.90 per night per person

Campsite availability: Year-round

Website: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/on/bruce

Location: Bruce Peninsula National Park is about an hour drive north from Owen Sound, and a four-hour drive west from Toronto.

Sleeping Giant Provincial Park

Enjoy stunning views of Lake Superior, the Sleeping Giant Mountain, and the boreal forest wildlife in this Northern Ontario provincial park.

What to do: Explore more than 100 km of hiking trails, geological features—such as the Sea Lion and Tee Harbour—and hike the Top of the Giant Trail and to the Thunder Bay Lookout.

Fees: Starting at $17.23 per campsite per night

Campsite availability: May to October

Website: https://www.ontarioparks.com/park/sleepinggiant

Location: Sleeping Giant Provincial Park is about an hour drive east from Thunder Bay.

A couple enjoy an autumn view of scenic Gatineau Park in Quebec.

Quebec

Mont-Tremblant National Park

This park is considered a canoer’s paradise, with its six rivers and 400 lakes and streams. It is also the largest park in Quebec and is filled with scenic mountains.

What to do: Climb 200 metres up the Via Ferrata du Diable mountain with guides and take in the beautiful landscape of the park.

Fees: Starting at $23.20 per campsite per night

Campsite availability: Year-round

Website: https://www.sepaq.com/pq/mot/index.dot?language_id=1

Location: Mont-Tremblant National Park is about a two-hour drive from both Ottawa and Montreal. 

Gatineau National Park

This 361-square kilometre conservation park is located where the Gatineau River meets the Ottawa River, and the Canadian Shield meets the St. Lawrence Lowlands, offering diverse ecosystems and breathtaking views.

What to do: Hike the many trails, including around Pink Lake, and visit the Mackenzie King Estate ruins.

Fees: Starting from $15 per night

Campsite availability: Year-round

Website: http://ncc-ccn.gc.ca/places-to-visit/gatineau-park

Location: Gatineau Park is only a 15-minute drive north from Parliament Hill in downtown Ottawa.

Jacques-Cartier National Park

This park is surrounded by valleys and mountains, providing breathtaking views for campers, especially while canoeing along the peaceful river.

What to do: White-water rafting

Fees: Starting at $23 per night

Campsite Availability: Year-round

Website: https://www.sepaq.com/pq/jac/index.dot?language_id=1

Location: Jacques-Cartier National Park is a short 30-minute drive north from Quebec City.

A whale's flukes reach out of the water off the coast of Gros Morne Park in Newfoundland.

Newfoundland & Labrador

Gros Morne National Park

This park was shaped by colliding continents and glaciers, creating mountains and fjords. The scenic park also has beaches, bogs, forests, and cliffs to admire.

What to do: Hike up to the summit of Gros Morne Mountain for a gorgeous panoramic view of the park and the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Fees: Starting from $26 per night

Campsite availability: May to September

Website: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/nl/grosmorne

Location: Gros Morne National Park is about an hour drive north from Corner Brook.

La Manche Provincial Park

Located in the La Manche Valley, this park includes a section of the La Manche River, along with large ponds and an abandoned fishing village.

What to do: For those who enjoy fishing, this park is well-known for its fishing cove on the southern shore.

Fees: Starting from $20 per night

Campsite Availability: May to September

Website: https://www.tcii.gov.nl.ca/parks/p_lm/

Location: La Manche Provincial Park is about an hour drive south from St. John’s.

Terra Nova National Park

Terra Nova is Canada’s most easterly national park. It has a boreal forest and sits near the coast of the North Atlantic Ocean.

What to do: Enjoy the beach and go for a swim at Sandy Pond.

Fees: Starting from $14 per night

Campsite availability: May to October

Website: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/nl/terranova

Location: The park is a two-hour drive north from St. John’s.

A riverside in New Brunswick, seen in autumn.

New Brunswick

Mactaquac Provincial Park

Located on the St. John River, this park has 300 campsites in both open and wooded areas. Visitors can enjoy hiking, swimming, fishing, and windsurfing. They can even go zip lining and play golf.

What to do: Visit the beaver pond nature reserve and try zip lining with the TreeGO Mactaquac Aerial Adventure.

Fees: Starting from $10 per campsite per night

Campsite availability: Year-round

Website: https://www.tourismnewbrunswick.ca/Products/Parks/MactaquacProvincialPark.aspx

Location: The park is a half-hour drive west from Fredericton.

Kouchibouguac National Park

This park is on New Brunswick’s Acadian coast, featuring mixed-wood forests, colourful marshes, and ocean beaches.

What to do: Go canoeing, look for grey seals, and view a ceremonial Mi’kmaq dance.

Fees: Starting from $16 per night

Campsite availability: Year-round

Website: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/nb/kouchibouguac

Location: This park is about an hour drive north from Moncton.

The Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia

Amherst Shore Provincial Park

With a mixed woodland setting along the shore of the Northumberland Strait, this park offers a great camping environment with some of the warmest saltwater swimming.

What to do: Walk down the beach to view the 12-metre-high red cliffs, and look out to the ocean for the legendary flaming ghost ship of the Northumberland Strait.

Fees: $26.70 per night

Campsite availability: June to October

Website: https://parks.novascotia.ca/content/amherst-shore

Location: This park is a half-hour drive east from Amherst.

Battery Provincial Park

This park is on the south coast of Cape Breton Island and overlooks St. Peters Bay and Bras d’Or Lake. The park has wooded areas, a beach, and a lighthouse for the entrance to St. Peters Canal.

What to do: Go for a hike on a walking trail and take in the views of the landscapes and water.

Fees: $26.70 per night

Campsite availability: June to October

Website: https://parks.novascotia.ca/content/battery

Location: This park is an hour drive south from Sydney.

Five Islands Provincial Park

This sea-side park rises from the shores of the Bay of Fundy with 90-metre sea cliffs. Visitors can watch the world’s highest tides, go hiking, rock collecting, and clam digging.

What to do: Take a hike along the Red Hill trail for a fantastic view.

Fees: Starting from $27 per night

Campsite availability: June to October

Website: https://parks.novascotia.ca/content/five-islands

Location: The park is almost a two-hour drive north from Halifax.

A lighthouse stands on the shore of Prince Edward Island with two gulls flying in the sky.

Prince Edward Island

Red Point Provincial Park

Located on the coast of P.E.I., this park is known for its beautiful, supervised beach. It also has plenty of nearby local attractions.

What to do: Take a walk along the beach and visit the nearby day-use Basin Head Provincial Park.

Fees: From $28 per day

Campsite availability: June to September

Website: https://www.tourismpei.com/provincial-park/red-point

Location: The park is a short 10-minute drive east from Souris.

Jacques Cartier Provincial Park

This park boasts waterfront campsites, trails, a beach, and comfort stations. There is also supervised swimming at the beach along the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  

What to do: Enjoy the beach and go for a walk and a swim.

Fees: Starting from $28 per day

Campsite availability: June to September

Website: https://www.tourismpei.com/provincial-park/jacques-cartier

Location: This park is only seven minutes north from Alberton.

Lord Selkirk Campground

This campground has campsites in wooded areas, but they are close enough that you could walk to the beach. The Belfast area celebrates its Scottish heritage with plenty of celebrations, music, and sports.

What to do: Take a stroll along the beach, go clam digging, and admire the views of the cliffs.

Fees: From $25 per day

Campsite availability: May to October

Website: https://www.tourismpei.com/search/OperatorDetails/name/LordSelkirkCampground/op_id/2199/qsid/59bcda138b3a39.29812387/

Location: This campground is a quick 6-minute drive north from Belfast.

With so many great campsites to discover all across Canada, your next adventure is only a quick roadtrip away. So what are you waiting for? Get your hammock camping gear packed and start exploring the beautiful country we’re lucky to call home.


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